Monday, July 13, 2009

Celebrating Wheat



I've always enjoyed the little leaflet cookbooks that the flour and yeast companies provide us with from time to time.
I'm so glad that my mom kept a few of the oldies for me.
They prove that some things are timeless. . .
I'm sometimes amused to see that things that are touted as "new methods" in recipes today. . are in the old little leaflets.
When I saw the Robin Hood Flour bag celebrating 100 years. .

I thought it might have been nice of them to send the flour to the stores in some flour sacks. . .
and make the bag "green". A flour sack to celebrate 100 years. . . would be worth making into a tea towel.

I did feel a sense of Canadian pride in what our farmers have produced over the years.
When my Grandparents imigrated from Russia . .
they were allowed to come to Canada with the understanding that they would clear land in the prairies. ..and grow wheat.
The first farming that my Dad did was in the prairies.
Canada has hard wheat that makes fantastic flour.



Just another reason to feel a little Canadian pride.
I think I'll pull out my bag of flour. . .
and do some baking. . .

You know me. . .I'm all about celebrating.

All for now. . .

14 comments:

  1. Love your mosaic and your story about wheat. Those old items bring back memories. I am so glad to hear you talk about being proud of your country. Blessings
    QMM

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  2. And we love that about you...
    Keep celebrating!!

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  3. Yum! I love the way you celebrate!

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  4. A great way to celebrate..with a bag of flour! Wonder what you will be baking today?

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  5. More fascinating facts from you and another reason to celebrate. What a heritage you have. Thanks for sharing it with us. Maybe you will share with us what you baked.

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  6. Great post, Lovella! I have photos in the heirloom albums that look rather like yours. And I still have a few hand-me-down flour sacks....and plenty of the little Robin Hood recipe pamphlets. RH is the only flour there is...right? It's the one I always choose.

    I'm wondering would find anything to celebrate here today?

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  7. What pride the immigrants must have felt to enter a country and by their labor add to the bounty. The hard winter wheat makes such excellent bread...while the southern soft wheat makes excellent biscuits and pie pastry.
    The old style of using local produce shaped the recipes of region, and the modern "locovor" who will only eat locally grown products is really a way that has been in use for generation.

    I would of thought a flour sack would have been appropriate too! they should hire us as consultants about such things....

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  8. Even though my days of celebrating wheat are over... sigh... I do still appreciate it!
    So I'll celebrate with you! and I do agree.. putting out a few fabric flour bags would be a great way to bring back memories for many of us who remember wearing them!! smile
    I love the old farming photos.

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  9. What'cha baking today, Lovella? Whatever it is, it'll be terrific. I enjoyed this little history lesson and, you're right, for truly big celebrations, the old-fashioned way might be nice as long as the flour was in its nice tight paper sack inside.

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  10. What would we do without wheat?
    It is a staple and source that mankind cannot live without.
    The Bible talks about the importance of the wheat kernel and it's nutritional value.
    Yes, we have so much to be thankful for.
    My mom always made tea towels from those cotton sacks.

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  11. You should have been on that committee that figured out how to celebrate - can you imagine how much extra flour they would have sold in those creamy white sacks?
    I figured out this weekend that you can make about 400 cinnamon buns from one 10kg (22 lbs) sack of flour.

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  12. I never knew that wheat could be hard or soft or that it would make a difference. Fascinating!

    I do remember flour sacks though! That would have been a great marketing tool for this 100 year mark.

    Enjoy your baking...will we be seeing the results on MGCC?

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  13. Thank you, Lovella and Canada, for producing such wonderful wheat so I can bake almond scones and dinner rolls and honey wheat bread!

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  14. Lovely to see some old pictures and hear more of your family history! i do love good wheat!!! I usually grind our whole wheat and I'm out! Yikes!! Guess I've got to set aside some time to get the grinder out.....probably not before vacation.

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Thank you!